Not rated yet

HELP WITH A PROMO VIDEO

Brad Gaulin

We are looking for a student or affordable young amateur who can help us create some imaginative video material to promote our company. Specifically there is a contest for a SaaS conference we want to enter that requires a video, we have some coole graphics a mascot, stuff that could be really good to build on

VIEW
Not rated yet

LinkedIn Optimization

Justin Brown

Any tools to maximize a LinkedIn account.

VIEW
Not rated yet

diets and healthy lifestyles

Perry Kinkaide

We are seeking topics for a series of articles about diet and health

VIEW
Not rated yet

seeking waste managenent topics

Perry Kinkaide

We've been asked for waste management topics about Alberta innovations.

VIEW
Not rated yet

Uber App

Taiwo Adeyemo

I am interested in developing an app like Uber's for my startup. I'll appreciate developer recommendations and cost implication information as well.

VIEW
Not rated yet

looking for summer student as marketing associate

Wael Badawy

We have two positions for summer student work for a marketing associate position. Please send me a message if you would like to join or if you know someone. Start day is Mid May.

VIEW
Not rated yet

Looking for Entrepreneurs to share their story on my program.

Wael Badawy

I am looking for Entrepreneurs who would like to be interviewed on my show. If you would like to take advantage of this opportunity, please send me a message. All interviews will use Blab and will be broadcast within two weeks of recording.

VIEW
Not rated yet

chemichal engineering

Armin Moniri

Hi there! My name is Armin. I am a NACE Certified (CP1 and PCS1) Chemical Engineer specialized in Corrosion Engineering, and Pipeline Coatings. I am also specialized in Multiphase Reaction Engineering and Simulation of Advanced Chemical & Biological Processes. Specialist in Catalyst Design and Characterization as well as Development of Thermochemical Cycles. Over 5 years in R&D Engineering, I have developed advanced skillsets in designing various chemical processes within industrial projects, and my most recent project was on the investigation of hydrogen sulfide splitting cycle for hydrogen production in order to make Oil Sands Bitumen upgrading sustainable through utilizing Corning Advanced Flow Reactors (AFRs) where the flow rate was increased 20 times. I’m highly motivated to further advance my career in the Chemical Production and Process Improvement sector. Would you be interested in starting a conversation? I’d love to get your opinions on some of my ideas to help improve your processes and help your team dominate the market. I can be reached on 7808514759 or by email at arminm16@gmail.com

VIEW

Looking for help - Unbroken mobile app for teen girls mental health

Katie Gaulin

I'm looking for people who might be interested in helping me with a social enterprise to help with teenage girls mental health. This is a concept we developed at an EduTech startup weekend which I would like to move ahead with and make into a reality because I think there is a HUGE need for it. Have a look at the information and please contact me if you are interested in getting involved with the project. Overview - UNBROKEN (unbrkn.org) - “you’ll be OK” is a mobile application to help teenaged girls to deal with their mental health concerns. Girls are at crisis point, mental health is the biggest risk they face. UnBroken gives teens the information, tools and support they need to manage their mental health concerns. The Problem - Mental health is the single biggest disabling condition for teen girls; 2 million+ teenage girls in Canada, 20-50% need help; Girls are >2 times as likely to need help as boys; Canada has the 3rd highest youth suicide in the industrialized world; Girls feel Isolated from fear of talking about it & being judged; Teen girls don’t relate to what’s there now for them to use The Solution - Cell phones are the primary information and communication tool for teen girls, therefore the best solution to connect with and support them is a mobile application that gives them the information, tools and support they need to manage their mental health concerns.

VIEW
Not rated yet

Retaining Talent in the Energy Industry - Putting unemployed and underemployed talent to work.

Brad Gaulin

I'm looking for feedback and potential investors to support a concept for an online talent marketplace where the 75,000 people laid of in the energy sector can package and sell their expertise to keep themselves engaged and working in the energy sector. Have a look at this concept presentation and let me know if you are interested in discussing the idea.

VIEW

Not rated yet

THE KEY TO ONLINE MARKETING IS CONTENT – MAKE YOURS GREAT

Brad Gaulin

THE KEY TO ONLINE MARKETING IS CONTENT – MAKE YOURS GREAT Online marketing is the new mantra for business because it has the potential to reach a global audience, be more targeted, and cost a lot less money; if you are willing to put in the work. It is new and high tech, but has the same requirements as traditional marketing. Online content still needs to answer the 3 key marketing questions: 1. Why should I care? (you must get my attention, stand above the noise on the web) 2. What’s in it for me? (give me something valuable that benefits me) 3. Why should I believe you? (be credible, don’t sound like a sales person) How do you create value for others with content? 1. Give them information they didn’t have before (thought leadership) 2. Entertain them (feel good) 3. Help them solve a problem (answer a hard question) 4. Help them develop their own skills (how to) 5. Help/empower them to deliver an outcome, succeed & look like a hero (do it yourself) Content follows a continuum of value, the list above goes from least valuable to most and reflects the increasing effort in preparation to make it more valuable. The reason most people don’t make great content is it takes a lot of work and that is the key, your value add is to do the work so others don’t have to. Simply put, the time and effort you spend on creating high value content is the time and effort you’ve saved others to do it for themselves, and depending on your level of expertise 1 hour of your time may equal 10 hours of theirs. What the internet gives you is the ability to share the value of your work with so many others and in doing so you will build your online brand and reputation by helping others. Below is a simple framework I use for content: CONTENT TYPE EXAMPLE RATING VALUE; COMMENTS INFORMATION (THOUGHT LEADERSHIP) Thought leadership, tell people something they don’t know – “an MIT research report says the future of work is contracts, not employment” GOOD Saves time; make this type of content interesting, useful and relevant. Simply re-sharing other’s content marginally builds your brand credibility, creating your own thought leadership is better if done well, information has a short shelf-life and limited reach as it is hard to get through the online noise ENTERTAINMENT (FEEL GOOD) Give people something to lighten their day – picture/audio/video/story of something cute (puppies), something funny, something inspirational, … GOOD Generate a positive feeling; this type of content creates a positive emotional association with your brand and has the potential to go viral; it doesn’t necessarily build your business credibility. Humour can be risky as not everyone interprets the way you intend RESOURCES (HOW TO) Give people something that gives direction, answers a question or solves a problem for them ie. – “Here are 10 things you need to do when setting up your new company” BETTER Save time, solve a problem that leverages / showcases your special expertise; this type of content has better staying power and builds your brand and image as a subject matter expert (SME) EMPOWERING (DO-IT-YOURSELF) Give people something that empowers them to solve their own problem, develop skills & produce results that makes them look like a hero ie. – “Here is a word template for a start-up founders share agreement complete with a shareholder spread sheet to keep track of everyone’s equity through multiple financings” BEST Save time, save money, solve a problem, look like a hero; this type of content enables someone to produce their own outcome, this give you the greatest credibility as a SME, you are positioning yourself as an educator and an enabler, and it invites people into more of a dialogue for you to help them fine tune their solution This content social marketing strategy is effective for business and for individuals looking for work. I have written more about how people looking for work can market themselves online in another article if you are interested. I develop content for both businesses and myself and when I am I think of this framework and I consider: what does my “target market” want or need most urgently; how can my knowledge or experience help; how much time do I have; and how many people will it be relevant to. Then I jump in and start writing, as you see here in this article. I hope this helps and if you have any comments or suggestions, please let me know.

VIEW
Not rated yet

15 TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK – MAKING CONFLICT WORK

Brad Gaulin

15 TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK – MAKING CONFLICT WORK 1. Feedback is communication to a person, or group, regarding the effect their behaviour is having on another person, the organization, the customer, or the team. 2. Positive feedback involves telling someone about good performance. Make this feedback timely, specific, and frequent. 3. Positive feedback in front of a group (recognition) is a powerful motivator. Most people want more recognition, so recognition effectively drives more of the behavior you want. 4. Constructive feedback alerts an individual to an area in which his performance could improve. Constructive feedback is not criticism; it is descriptive and should always be directed to the action, not the person. 5. The main purpose of constructive feedback is to help people understand where they stand in relation to expected and/or productive job behaviour. One on one constructive feedback is better for sensitive people or situations, group feedback can be a more powerful influence. 6. Effective feedback always focuses on a specific behaviour, not on a person or their intentions which implies a value judgements of the person. (When you held competing conversations during the meeting, when Mary had the floor, you distracted the people in attendance.) 7. Effective feedback is specific, not general. (Saying, "The report you turned in yesterday was well-written, understandable, and made your points about the budget very effectively." Works better than, "good report.") 8. Effective feedback describes actions or behaviour that the individual can do something about. 9. Effective feedback involves the sharing of information and observations. It does not include advice unless you have permission “Can I give you some advice?” or advice was requested. 10. Effective feedback is well timed. Whether the feedback is positive or constructive provide the information as close to the event as possible. 11. Effective feedback involves what or how something was done, not why. Asking why is asking people about their motivation and provokes defensiveness. 12. The best feedback is sincerely and honestly provided to help others be more effective. Trust me, people will know if they are receiving it for any other reason. 13. Whenever possible, feedback that is requested is more powerful. Ask permission to provide feedback. Say, "I'd like to give you feedback on the presentation, is that okay with you?" 14. Check to make sure the other person understood what you communicated by getting their feedback (ask a clarifying question) or observing changed behavior or body language. 15. Effective feedback is consistent. If the actions are great today, they're great tomorrow. If the policy violation merits discipline, it should always merit discipline.

VIEW
Not rated yet

The Fall of The American Empire and How to Stop It

Brad Gaulin

THE FALL OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE & HOW TO STOP IT I met an amazing couple, Warren & Margo, in an elevator and proceeded for 1 ½ hours to have one of the most interesting conversations I can remember, standing in front of the elevator. Near the end of our conversation, someone made the comment of how refreshing it was and that we don’t have these types of discussions anymore because when we do, we lose friends. The more I thought about it, the more this saddened and concerned me. One of the most controversial topics we discussed was the American election and my fear for my children’s future. My American friends, and theirs, are traumatized with what is happening and too uncomfortable to discuss it. And it isn’t just America. In Canada, Germany, Britain and the entire western world it seems we’ve lost the ability to engage in healthy conflict, and we’ve given over to polarized, mutual character assassination. Our discourse focuses on personalities, mutual distrust and the fundamental, zero sum premises that one of us the right and the other is wrong. You are either with me or against me. If this is the foundation for our conversations, they will always be destructive and divisive. So where did we go wrong? Western societies were built on the concept of healthy conflict and debate, back to the Greeks and the Socratic philosophy. The founders of America, in the constitution recognized it, and entrenched its critical role in the constitution in the fundamental right to the freedom of speech; and built the world’s greatest democracy on it (which we are now tearing apart). I’m a Canadian, and I see America like our big brother, who sets the example, and the political example I see now is this downward spiral of disrespect, mistrust and absolute polarization. I believe that our society is in peril, therefore we need to go back to the fundamental values and principles that drove our success in the first place and with an entrepreneurial mind set, take them, adapt them to today’s harsh reality and come up with a new strategy to succeed. We must persevere and constantly change and adapt while still holding on to the common goal and worthy vision we can all agree on. We all know that the key to solving a problem is to first recognize that we have one. I believe we can all agree that we have a problem, our political system, reflected in our social discourse, is broken. The first step toward fixing the problem is for us to identify a common goal, a greater purpose that we all agree is worthy of debate. Every business and thought leader advises us to start with the end in mind. Focus on what we want, not on what we don’t want, because our focus becomes our reality. The most eloquent description of this that I love is by FRANK OUTLAW: “Watch your thoughts, they become words; watch your words, they become actions; watch your actions, they become habits; watch your habits, they become character; watch your character, for it becomes your destiny.” The focus of our thoughts has become negative and destructive and we need to flip this focus around to positive and creative. We need to build futures for our children which are greater than the ones we started with, not lesser! I think as people, we can all agree that we owe our children a better future, regardless of race, color, creed, religion or any other artificial definition that divides us. Agreeing to a shared vision isn’t that hard. We don’t have to re-invent the wheel. The American constitution defined the requirements and vision for what it takes to make a great society, so let’s recycle that as a starting point. What I love most is its simple, fundamental recognition of equal rights and respect for all, with no exceptions. I can think of no better starting point. In truth, I like it better than my Canadian constitution that recognizes all sorts of special interests, which entrenches arbitrary definitions that divide us. That is the starting point. Next we need to agree that we do in fact share some common worthy goals, at a personal level, that are greater, and take precedence over the in-genuine posturing of any political propaganda. My personal worthy goal is that I want to build a better future for all of our children, not just my own, where they are valued, respected and empowered to build a society where everyone can prosper, not just a select few; where they have the rights and responsibilities associated with freedom; and recognize our obligation as our brother’s keeper, to universally help and support each other. I am excited about our youth. As the internet generation, they recognize better than my generation, that we are one global tribe, we share one planet, and until all of us are prosperous, we will never have peace and none of us will truly feel safe or secure. In the battle for survival as a species, we need to adopt the military philosophy of “no-one-left-behind”. If one of us fails, we all fail. Furthermore, to achieve this worthy goal, we have to reclaim our foundation of mutual respect and our right to intelligent debate / discussions. Our discussions must happen in an atmosphere of mutual respect, and where people feel safe to share their thoughts. Therefore, we need to have ground rules, based on a shared expectation that we will respect each other’s right to an opinion, and that we will conduct ourselves in a manner that is respectful. The principals and ground rules I use for respectful behavior and healthy conflict in the teams I lead are:  We will treat each other in a respectful manner (regardless of how we feel). Physical fighters follow respectful rules of conduct, so why can’t we?  The first and foremost goal is simply to understand each other’s perspectives, not who’s right or wrong. If we just achieve mutual understanding, then everyone wins, and it is much easier to take the next step to consensus, or agreement, and ultimately to make better decisions.  PEOPLE ARE SAFE, IDEAS ARE NOT  Listen generously, first to understand, then be understood  Be bold, blunt and brief  Encourage others to contribute  Focus on ideas and issues, not people  Speak for yourself, not others  Disagree without being disagreeable  Be additive, not repetitive  Once you have been understood, enough, just move on  Be 100% present and engaged (in the here and now)  The group will not tolerate disrespectful behaviour from anyone  Keep perspective. Debates can be fun if we follow these guidelines. So I challenge myself and every one of us, as individuals, to be leaders in our communities; all of us can support healthy, respectful dialogues by simply:  Pointing out what we are doing that isn’t working and offering a more constructive approach.  Demonstrating and facilitating a high level of respect and trust (I don’t trust what I don’t understand), to encourage passionate, emotional debate  Demonstrating genuine vulnerability first  Creating an environment that supports vulnerability  Not tolerating inappropriate behavior: o Humour/sarcasm targeting vulnerability o Personal attacks or criticism Lastly, we must demand these behaviours from our leaders; if they can’t set the example in creating a constructive democratic dialogue, then they aren’t competent to lead. All I know is that continuing to do what we are doing today will lead us to the fall of the American (western) empire and I’ll do everything in my power to prevent that. Including sharing these ideas that I hope and pray people will use to have healthy debates, to remind myself to always pursue mutual understanding, which leads to better decisions and takes us to a more respectful, prosperous future for all. If you can share this, help in creating a healthier dialogue in our communities, then maybe we can save our civil society. Thank you for reading this and I wish you only health, happiness and prosperity.

VIEW
Not rated yet

Making Role Based Mentoring Work

Brad Gaulin

MAKING ROLE BASED MENTORING WORK I’ve interviewed and worked with literally hundreds of people on mentoring and when I ask them about what they think of mentoring, they consistently think of and describe very distinct roles; specifically as a mentor, or a mentee. Which to me implies a very strict, defined relationship; are you giving or are you receiving, and the exchange has an implicit direction of benefit. This is a clean and simple structure, but I don’t think it reflects the variety of experiences nor does it reflect the changing behaviours and expectations of different generations. Regardless, it is a tried and proven arrangement that almost everyone I talked to reflected on it as a very positive experience and for some it was life changing. The only caveat I heard was about 35% of those I talked to didn’t get past the awkward getting to know you stage, and graduate to the making a difference stage. When I talk to people who manage and run mentoring programs their descriptions and comments are typically about qualifying mentors, how we scope the role, the required expertise (ie. 10,000 hrs), mentoring skills, mentor training, etc. When we talk about mentees, it was also about qualifying them, preparing them for their role as well. Ultimately it seems that the perceived key to success of most mentoring programs I’ve researched is finding the best match, which is done usually by the organizers who’s role is as a 3rd party facilitator to the mentor/mentee relationship. The prequalification is really the first step in the matching process, which is the first step in the mentoring process. Once that is done, the next phase is the ice breaking phase, this is the first critical junction and can be very difficult without guidance or a process. Just connecting people leads to the meeting where the first question is “what shall we talk about?”. Not an auspicious start. The most effective role based mentoring programs I’ve seen in practice have a very structured process that enables both parties to set expectations and work through the process to achieve a much more consistent outcome. There is still the relationship aspect, are they able to make a personal connection, is there chemistry between them in their interactions, but even for these I find it happens more often when the process guides them toward exploratory conversations to build mutual understanding. So having a topic of conversation to set the tone for each meeting is crucial and I like starting the discussion around exploring each other’s past. My definition of mentoring is helping someone else succeed, therefore I find it works better when the discussion topics thereafter focus on understanding the mentee’s ambitions, goals, needs, issues and challenges. As a mentor I think listening is the most important skill. I personally find that when I truly understand another person it is only natural for me to care and trust them, and my relationships are always constructive when it is based on this foundation. In terms of a detailed structured process, there are many organizations that support role based mentoring and I’ve included links below to some that will get you started: Mentoring.org – http://www.mentoring.org/downloads/mentoring_418.pdf IACTM – http://www.iactm.com/about/mentoring-methodologies MIT Venture Mentoring Service - http://vms.mit.edu/outreach-programs Hayes Group - http://www.thehayesgroupintl.com/mentor_process.pdf USfirst.org – http://www.usfirst.org/uploadedFiles/Community/FRC/Team_Resources/Mentoring%20Guide.pdf Aspirationtech.org - https://aspirationtech.org/downloads/AspirationEAdvocacyMentoringMethodologyPaper.pdf Chronus / HRU.gov https://hru.gov/documents/MentoringStudio/How%20Coaching%20%20Mentoring%20Can%20Drive%20Success%20in%20Your%20Organization.pdf

VIEW
Not rated yet

What is Mentoring for Millennials?

Brad Gaulin

WHAT IS MENTORING FOR MILLENNIALS? It’s funny, through my career I’ve been mentored by many different people, I’ve mentored many in return and in the process I’ve never worried about how we define it, its simply been a great experience where I get as much as I give, regardless of my role as mentor or mentee. I find it ironic that the only time a definition of roles becomes an issue is when I talk about the concept of mentoring, not when I’m doing it. Whether I’m talking with HR people in organizations or talking with academics in schools, they seem to have a very specific idea of what mentoring is and they seem to like to debate it at length, what is mentoring, vs. coaching, vs teaching, etc., it seems important to them. In my experience, it isn’t important in the moment, when we are doing it, the only thing that is important is that we are helping each other and both benefiting from it. So I’ve come up with a simple definition of mentoring that works for me and also reflects the true nature of the experiences I’ve had. I define mentoring as simply helping someone else succeed. The most important aspect of mentoring to me is the servant attitude, I realized that mentoring is not about me and what I think I have to offer, its about the other person, its about being focused on helping them with their needs and making a difference for them. I realized it starts by truly and deeply listening and understanding the other person. Once I understand their goals and needs then I’m in a position to help them in whatever way is most appropriate. The one action that I believe is unique to mentoring is sponsoring, when I act as a reference for someone else and put my own reputation at risk for them. I’ve had many mentor relationships that have never reached that point, but the few that have are my closest relationships. Regardless, having the attitude of service and gratitude for being able to share the mentoring experience (regardless of my role) works much better for me and I feel I get much more than I give in doing so.

VIEW
Not rated yet

Mentoring - A title isn't enough for millennials!

Brad Gaulin

MENTORING – A TITLE ISNT ENOUGH FOR MILLENIALS In a meeting with a management team I advise, the HR director said, “I have to leave the meeting for a call, I’m going to fire my mentor.” When she came back from her call she said it had gone well, it sounded like the mentor was as relieved as she was to stop meeting. I asked her tell me about her experience. She thought a mentor would be a great way to advance her career and had applied for, and been assigned a mentor through her professional association. It was a big deal to qualify for the program, it took 3 months to be matched and she had to take an orientation course in preparation. It seemed like a wonderful idea at the start but after 3 months of meetings, twice a month, she realized it wasn’t working, she was dreading the meetings and didn’t want to continue. I asked about her anxiety and what didn’t work for her in the arrangement. After, reflecting for a few minutes, she explained that in spite of their mutual desire to make it work, they just weren’t connecting, it was almost like they spoke different languages their perspectives and approaches were so different. The meetings were directed by the mentor and they were following a structured program, but she had some specific challenges she wanted help with, that the mentor didn’t seem to want to spend time on. The problems weren’t specific to HR, there were some legal issues, leadership and team management and communications problems she wanted help with and it seemed that her mentor didn’t feel comfortable advising her on those issues. So in spite of everyone’s best intentions she felt that it wasn’t giving her what she’d hoped for, particularly given how much time it was taking, every meeting took about 3 hours, traveling to meet, the meeting, traveling back to her office. So she decided to end it. Then I asked, “what would you change to make it work for you?” She said, “I don’t just want advice, I really want to learn by doing, so I’d like a mentor who can help me in solving real problems. It would be great if I could have several mentors and get different perspectives. I’d like to be able to meet online, skype or google so we don’t have to travel unless we really want to. My mentor was 25 years older than me, I’d like to be able to choose for myself and have more flexibility in when and how often we meet. Overall I’d like it to be flexible, make my own choices and set my own agenda, so something that fits better with my crazy schedule and my work in a small company where I have to deal with every type of problem imaginable.” I admire her courage in making a tough decision and acting on it, so I offered her my online credentials, I said, “setup your virtual group of mentors and put me in it, and when you have a problem, let us know and I’ll help you when I can”. I’m not an HR professional, but have experience in most of the types of problems she described. So it’s an informal relationship, she feels my experiences will help her and I’m more than happy to share it if we can do it in virtually. This works for both my millennial friend and me, as a zoomer; we are bridging the generation gap by simply working on problems together (me and her other friends, no titles required).

VIEW
Not rated yet

CERI on the Impact of Low Oil Prices on the Canadian Economy

Brad Gaulin

CERI does some great research and analysis, this is their publication which everyone in Canada should know about, get the facts on energy in Canada and how key it is to our economy and prosperity. The decline in crude oil prices over the last year and a half is one of the most complex shocks for any economy and one that is important to measure and understand. This report measures potential impacts on the Canadian economy if low oil prices persist into the future. At the global macro level, the positive effects of a decrease in crude oil price on energy-importing countries will likely more than offset the negative effects on exporting countries resulting in a net positive impact on global growth. For exporting countries, like Canada, however, the real complexity appears beneath the surface, where the drop in commodity prices mobilizes sectoral and regional forces that can take years to play out. These include higher consumer spending in response to lower energy costs, lower spending due to higher prices on imported goods and services (as a result of the falling Canadian dollar), falling investment and employment in the economy’s resource sector, and rising investment and employment in the non-resource sectors. The purpose of this report is to present economic impacts on the Canadian economy stemming from two short-term scenarios, spanning 7 years: a Reference Case, where the oil prices are forecasted to grow from current levels to almost $73.00 per barrel (in 2014 dollars) and a Low Case, where oil prices reach only $51.00 per barrel by 2021. The modelling of these impacts is done using CERI’s Input-Output model to measure the impacts on major macroeconomic variables such as GDP, employment and tax revenues. The modelling results indicate that the net effect of low crude oil prices on Canada is negative. And as a rule of thumb, for every Canadian dollar gain in WTI price, Canadian GDP would gain almost $1.7 billion, on average.

VIEW
Not rated yet

CERI Oil & Gas Outlook (2016-2036)

Brad Gaulin

CERI does some great research and analysis, this is their publication which everyone in Canada should know about, get the facts on energy in Canada and how key it is to our economy and prosperity. In a low cost environment for both oil and natural gas, the future of Canada’s conventional oil and gas development is being questioned. The last two years have seen significant declines in drilling and production as Canadian supply costs are high relative to the commodity prices. CERI’s “Canadian Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production and Supply Costs Outlook (2016 – 2036)” breaks down drilling and production forecasts as well as supply costs across the various producing regions in Canada. Total natural gas production is expected to start to rise by 2019 as the price of gas increases and drilling rates overcome well decline rates. The rise in the gas production is totally dependent on whether LNG projects will be constructed. While oil prices are expected to rise as well, conventional crude production is expected to drop slightly and remain stable throughout the study period, as growth is concentrated in the oil sands. The Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin will see the vast majority of both natural gas production and conventional crude oil production, however, offshore Newfoundland will contribute approximately one-tenth of the crude oil over the study period.

VIEW
Not rated yet

What does everyone graduate without?

Justin Brown

We go to school to get guidance, training and experience in a field we’re looking to excel in, but what people don’t have is a direct focus. That’s where a mentor would come in, or at least used to come in...

VIEW
Not rated yet

World Heavy Oil Congress 2016

Justin Brown

Listen to international thought leaders from CNOOC, PDVSA, Halliburton and more at the Presentation Theatre in the World Heavy Oil Congress exhibition area.

VIEW

Not rated yet

Team Lead

Leighton Healey

I lead a technology company in Calgary. I mentor at local accelerators. I am a book worm.

VIEW
Not rated yet

Sarah Lewis

Not rated yet

Mackenzie Argent

Not rated yet

HR Manager

UNIVERSAL GEOMATICS SOLUTIONS CORP.

Brenda Lynes

Not rated yet

CFO

Inkubate Packaging

Carol Alexandruk

Not rated yet

Tj Gross

Not rated yet

Karen Simmons

Not rated yet

Miranda Mantey

Not rated yet

Randal B. Adcock, MA

Not rated yet

CEO

metrax.ca

Glenn Hughes

As a practice partner at metrax.ca, I continue to improve cost control and related business process to create strategic advantage in a manner that increases revenue potential while reducing operating costs. A Bachelor of Commerce degree and an Engineering Technology diploma initiated over 25 years of diverse experience in business management, project management, business process automation, records management, and system implementations. Extensive experience in a variety of industries and countries has provided the foundation to quickly analyze business needs and develop practical solutions that create strategic business advantage.

VIEW